All posts by atimeforhorses

The Horse at War



“A horse, a horse! My Kingdom for a horse!” Having lost his mount, standing amid the chaos of war that August day in a Leicestershire field, Richard Plantagenet, third of that name to sit on the throne of England, knew the value of a horse in battle.

A solider on a horse is more than a human sitting on an animal. Mounting the steed blends and multiplies both of their capabilities, combining the horse’s size, power, range, and mobility with man’s cunning, adaptability, and sadly rich capacity for making war. The result is a war-machine with a man’s brain and a horse’s power.

In this episode, Abby takes us through the centuries as the human-horse relationship evolved from use as a food source to unified action in battle. Of course, it’s the human’s battle, not the horse’s.Mounted war has been part of human history since the early days of the Roman Empire. Stirrupless cavalry, lightly armed and poorly armored, was used rarely in the major Roman battles. It did have great mobility and range, though, and served to guard the borders of the Empire; pickets against the Barbarian hordes.

Too late to save the Empire, the stirrup arrived somewhere around the turn of the 7th Century, giving the rider more control over the horse, and the cavalry’s capacity as a fighting unit grew. The stirrup allowed Mongol archers to amass an empire which was, at its height, bordered by the Pacific, The North Sea, The Persian Gulf, The Black Sea and the Sea of Japan.

The long-bow, and then firearms, spelled the end of the armored horse and rider, but not the mounted warrior. This evolution is clearest in the shrinking armor of the Cuirassiers and the Heavy Cavalries of the Napoleonic Wars. They served the same mission as the knights of old – direct attack – but did it wearing a breast plate (cuirass) at most.

The value of the mounted warrior was still not in doubt. There were now Heavy Cavalry, Light Cavalry and Dragoons – each with its own specialized job on the battle space, each a platoon of fighting horsemen. It only takes a single viewing of Lady Butler’s “Scotland Forever!”, depicting the Royal Scots Greys and a Heavy Cavalry unit at full charge at Waterloo, to understand two things: a cavalry charge was a barely controlled stampede; and the cavalryman’s major weapon was not in his hand. He was riding it.

For the rest of the 19th century, tactics would not change, but the relationship of warrior to war horse would. In the disaster of the Crimea, a light cavalry unit was used with no support from heavy cavalry nor infantry in the rear. But that is a story for another time.

As the bow and the gun had marked the end of the knight, so the Maxim gun and the tank ended the relationship of horse and rider as fellow combatants. There would be a few more notable cavalry charges: Polish Lancers against the Blitzkrieg; Americans during the fall of Bataan; British in Burma. All honorable, all majestic, all doomed. The Australian Light Horse made a successful charge at Beersheba in 1917, and the Italian Savoia Cavalleria defeated a sizable Soviet force at Izbushensky in 1942. But that was the end. The army got rid of its war horses, and the internal combustion engine did the rest. All brawn, no brain. A better time for horses.

During the first days of the current Afghan war, soldiers of the 5th Special Forces Group, by dint of necessity, formed an irregular dragoon force and successfully engaged superior Taliban forces. From Rome to Mazar-i-Sharif men and horses have combined as a mobile, agile combat unit of impressive range and versatility. What the soldiers wore and fought with changed, but they were always found in the same place. On horseback.

Sources for this episode

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Mann, D.H., Groves, et al. (2015) Life and extinction of megafauna in the ice-age Arcti…


Vagabond



Across cultures and throughout time, tales and legends from around the world show us a clear set of universal character types, or archetypes. These characters are so universal that the psychologist Carl Jung developed his theory of personality around them. Among Jung’s archetypes you will find such regulars as The Innocent, The Warrior, The Lover, and The Outlaw. For Jung, these characters represent the basic themes of human experience, and so, they connect directly to our own emotions.

Of these archetypes, there is none that inspires our curiosity and amusement more than The Trickster. Many old and established native cultures have legendary characters whose role in story is to always know the secret that the rest of us don’t. Trickster is the joker, the raven, the confidence man. Creative, clever, quick to think and act, and never living in fear of the consequences. The Trickster makes us laugh when he fools others. His promiscuous behavior embarrasses us, and we are fascinated with the confidence and comfort with which he deceives others.

You know The Trickster well. He is Captain Jack Sparrow, Axel Foley, and Trapper John. Wile E. Coyote and Happy Gilmore. He plays “catch me if you can” with the authorities. He is the sympathetic miscreant with a sense of humor.

How much freedom would you have if you took on that role? Few of us do, as we believe we owe it to the larger society to remember our duties and remain the responsible character of Everyman, The Caregiver, or The Good Friend. It is The Trickster’s need for freedom, his penchant for boredom, and his willingness to step outside the bounds of proper behavior that attract our attention.

Listen as Abby tells this at-least-partly-true tale of Henry Tufts, a real-life Trickster from Revolutionary War era America, whose escapades made him so notorious that he earned wide renown in his own time, and is still known to those carrying the Tufts name as the “black sheep” of the family.

Sources for this episode

Interesting reading on this topic:

Allie, D. (2017) The Online Henry Tufts Resource (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017 from  https://henrytufts.wordpress.com/

New England Historical Society. (2016) The Many Loves of Henry Tufts. Retrieved December 7, 2017 from  http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/henry-tufts-original-colonial-badboy/

Robinson, J.D. (2011) Henry Tufts Wrote First American Criminal Autobiography. Seacoast NH (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017 from http://www.seacoastnh.com/history/history-matters/henry-tufts-wrote-first-american-criminal-autobiography/

Society in Dedham for Apprehending Horse Thieves. Retrieved December 7, 2017 from http://www.dedhamhorsethieves.org/index.html

Tufts, T. (2012) Henry Tufts, Black Sheep of an Otherwise Respectable Family. Nutfield Genealogy (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017 from https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/09/henry-tufts-black-sheep-of-otherwise.html 

Tufts, T. (2017) Tufts Family Genealogy (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017 from http://tuftsgenealogy.blogspot.com/

Vaver, A. (2009). Early American Crimes: Burglary, Part I. Early American Crime (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017 from http://www.earlyamericancrime.com/crimes/burglary-1

Vaver, A. (2010). Early American Criminals: Henry Tuft in the Castle. Early American Crime (blog). Retrieved December 7, 2017. http://www.earlyamericancrime.com/criminals/henry-tufts-castle

If you love our website, it was built by these guys:
Ricky Bloxsom, Graphic Designer http://www.rbloxsom.com/
Chris Heinen, Web Developer http://heinencreative.com/

Contributors:
Abby Nemec, Story Research and Podcast Production
Ricky Bloxsom, Visual Design and Website Development
Lanin’s Southern Serenaders,


Lightning in a Bottle



We know that genetics is the science of heredity. It’s likely common knowledge that in the last half-century, human understanding of that science has exploded. Each year, the pool of knowledge grows, so that now, humans, working in a laboratory, can manipulate the genetic material stored in organisms already living or yet to be born.

As long as humans have been producing plants and animals for their own needs, we have known that the young would resemble their parents in a variety of ways. Since the middle of the 1800s, we have been moving toward a better understanding of exactly how this occurs. We know more and more about the molecular nature of inheritance, and research is bringing us closer to connecting genes with genetic traits.

Less than half a century ago, the study of genetics seemed simply to be a matter of figuring out which traits were recessive and which were dominant, and how many genes produced any given trait. You know—the brown eyes / blue eyes idea. It was very straightforward. We were years away from mapping the human and equine genomes. That process, once completed, brought the realization that only a thousandth of that material was unique to an individual, and only about 4% of DNA separates a human from a chimpanzee.

Each time we think we know more, we discover so many more things that we realize we don’t know at all. Sometimes, when we discover something new, we also have to “unknow” something we were convinced was true. Not long ago, many of us believed that the field of genetics would give us a “blueprint” for life, as though DNA was a sort of simple assembly plan to create living organisms. New discoveries now contradict this idea, suggesting that nuclear DNA is less like a blueprint than a cake recipe, where one ingredient affects how the other ingredients behave.

A small proportion of genetic material points to physical characteristics, like hair color and earlobe shape, as we believed. Now, it seems large amounts of what was thought to be “junk DNA” turns out to be functional. Some of that function turns out to be tied to biochemistry, whether a gene gets turned on or off, and a whole lot of other things that are hard to make sense of, but there is also much still out there beyond our knowing.

For example, two hundred years ago, many believed that simply stabling horses together would affect the color of foals born in that barn. The more is known about genetics, and the more we learn about how much of this system remains outside our grasp, the better we realize that breeding is much more complicated than cutting, pasting, and photocopying. Sometimes, we get a surprise.

The Thoroughbred is unique among horse breeds, in that The Jockey Club allows registration – and the right to race – only to horses produced by live cover. Artificial insemination is not allowed, nor embryo transfer, nor cloning. This ensures the continued careers of many more colts because their semen cannot travel farther than they can. It also keeps as much diversity as possible in the breed and ensures a breeding career for horses who are not stakes winners.

The Quarter Horse breed faced the effect of extreme overuse of semen from “the stallion of the moment,” meaning whoever was the model horse at the time, resulting in the devastating spread of a muscle function disease caused by a single genetic mutation from one sire. In the Standardbred breed, artificial insemination is allowed so the frozen semen of top class horses can be shipped worldwide. Unless a colt is among the best available, he must make good earnings as a racehorse because of the challenge for him to earn a profit at stud.

And yet – even with the apparent handicap of the live cover restriction and the vast uncertainty of what science cannot tell us – astute horsemen have for centuries carefully tracked performance and pedigrees.


Regulatory Discretion



This is the story of how a decision was made, with all the best intentions and for all the right reasons, to withdraw the prescription drug pergolide mesylate from the market in 2007. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made the announcement through its usual channels, intending to protect the health of human Parkinson’s Disease patients. At the time, nobody at the FDA knew that this would put the lives of tens of thousands of elderly horses at risk. They would find out soon enough.

In this episode, we tell the story of the events that followed the announcement.

Drugs and other health related treatments, procedures, and research, are regulated by government bureaucracies. Generally, we want it that way because such important and potentially dangerous substances and effects need to be controlled by something other than the market place. The FDA has a crucial role to play in all of our lives.

Of course, health, illness, and treatment depend on what we know and don’t know, and knowledge or its absence is never value-free. It is controlled by ideology and identity. People who are underrepresented have often had to organize themselves and fight so that their interests would be recognized and safeguarded by the government, and the FDA in particular.

During the AIDS crisis in the 1980s, when it seemed that the disease only affected gay men and IV drug users, research and drug development was obstructed until gay men organized themselves massively, and became very loud, staging dramatic events to make their voices heard. Recently, the people of Flint, Michigan had to work hard to raise awareness about lead contamination of their drinking water.

This story deals with a similar dynamic, but it’s about horses. The pergolide withdrawal had been made by people who didn’t have elderly horses, so they didn’t know how many horses’ lives were put at risk by the decision, until an online Equine Cushing’s Disease support group made them care.

Equine Cushing’s Disease, more accurately called pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID), is a progressive disease of older horses that severely affects the horse’s quality of life and, if untreated, usually leads to euthanasia for humane reasons.

Listen as Abby tells the story of how a group of committed owners raised their voices and made powerful officials care about something that they didn’t know about, because it only affected a small group of Americans. Of course, they should care about it (because they officially represent all of us), but they didn’t know. It is the story of the dedicated individuals whose activism made it possible for us today to be able to treat a PPID horse with a drug that allows them to live another decade in comfort and dignity. It is often easy to forget these histories, and take for granted the services we rely on, whether we are the human patient or the guardian of an elderly horse. Take in the dramatic history you are about to learn.

Below are links to the resources used in preparing this episode, including the archives from the Equine Cushing’s and Insulin Resistance support discussion group, which is where this story takes place. Their full website houses a vast collection of resources related to the topic of caring for horses affected by these two distinct but related conditions.

Sources for this episode

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Informational website:
ECIR Group and Kellon, E. (2017) Equine Cushing’s and Insulin Resistance Group. Retrieved July 9, 2017 from https://www.ecirhorse.org/

Support page for charitable donations:
ECIR Group. (2017) How to help ECIR. Retrieved July 9, 2017 from https://www.ecirhorse.org/how-to-help-ECIR.php

The discussion group:
ECIR Group. (2017) Equine Cushing’s ECIR Forum and Files.


Persistence of Vision



This concludes our story about Eadweard Muybridge, telling how he and Leland Stanford formed a collaboration that would forever change the world through a match made in technological heaven. The project was conceived, managed, and funded by Stanford, the railroad tycoon and former governor of California who was known to the political cartoonists as “The Octopus.” The daily work of the project – including obsessive attention to the details of the art and science of it all – was overseen by the temperamental artist-photographer-inventor Muybridge, who was a household name in his own right in the 1870s.

In this episode, we see the 19th Century to a close, pulling together the many threads from psychology, art, photography, industry, and the curious relationship between the photographer, the robber baron, and the horses.

To the tune of nearly a million dollars in today’s money, these two men worked tirelessly to develop the equipment, the open-air studio, and the process needed to produce the first sequential stop action photographs of an object in motion. The fact that the object was a horse is only part of why this story is interesting.

Stanford’s reasons for wanting the images made reflect his obsession with his horses. Muybridge’s reasons for wanting to make the images reflect his obsession with photographic technology. The struggles that the images themselves created in both men’s lives reflect their mutual pride in the completed work. They are both renowned to this day for the true events of their lives, but even as legends grew up around this story, they are also known for the work, the images themselves, and the change they would make in our world.

As the Gilded Age gave way to the political reforms of the early 20th Century, we march boldly forward into the age of electric and electronic devices that provide all manner of visual entertainment. We see the persistence of Muybridge and Stanford rewarded with the breakthrough development of truly instantaneous photography.

The ability to stop motion in an instant, and so to freeze action, opened a world of new information and introduced a revolutionary form of entertainment that could be enjoyed by groups of people, together, sitting side by side in a common viewing space. Other inventors would capitalize on this breakthrough and leave Muybridge in the past, but his contribution has been recorded and the shared vision of both men has become a reality.

The effect that Muybridge’s stop-motion images had on our culture is not limited to technology, nor to the first glimpse of today’s most pervasive form of visual communication. They also changed forever the way that horses are depicted in the visual arts. In this episode, Abby tells the story of how that happened.

Sources for this episode

Video:

Christie, D. (2015). The Emperor of Time. Retrieved on April 12, 2017 from  https://vimeo.com/131586644
The strange and sordid tale of Eadweard Muybridge, the man who accidentally invented motion pictures. The film is told from the point of view of Muybridge’s abandoned son, and viewed completely through a nineteenth century early cinema contraption called a mutoscope.

Books:

Ball, E. (2013). The Inventor and the Tycoon: a Gilded Age Murder and the Birth of Moving Pictures. New York: Doubleday.
Available from amazon.com in Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audible audiobook editions.

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Jaffe, I. and Colombardo, G. (1983). The flying gallop: east and west. The Art Bulletin, Vol. 65, No. 2 (Jun., 1983), pp. 183-200. College Art Association. Retrieved February 17, 2017 from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3050317 

Kingston Museum (2017) Eadweard Muybridge. The Royal Borough of Kingston-upon-Thames. Retrieved on April 12,


Staff Sergeant Reckless



We conclude our story of Reckless, a native Korean mare who became a United States Marine. This episode tells how this extraordinary mare made a life in the United States after the Korean War, and how she has been honored by the U.S. Marines, the government of South Korea, and others. The first two parts of the story are told in Episode 2 Flame of the Morning, and Episode 3 Pride of the Marines.

Many animals have given military service over the centuries, but this one was unique. She worked alone, she kept herself safe, and she took care of her comrades in arms during some pretty terrifying action. The Marines who served with her were so amazed by what she did that they shipped her over land, air, and sea to bring her to the states.

They housed her at Camp Pendleton out of gratitude and respect for her service, and recognized her sacrifices by giving her rank and promotion. She was retired at the base, had a number of foals, and even after her death has been recognized repeatedly for her incredible courage.

Follow the last part of our story about this extraordinary little red mare, the size of a pony, with a heart as deep as the ones of national legends like Man o’ War or Secretariat. Like them, she gave it her all.

Listen as Abby tells the story of how this young horse became a living symbol of courage, and perseverance, , and how nearly 50 years after her death she is still remembered for her selfless service.

Contacts related to the life of Staff Sergeant Reckless:

The People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals has a website at pdsa.org.uk where you can make a “help a vet help a pet” in the United Kingdom.
Robin Hutton administers a website at sgtreckless.com, where you can donate to the registered charity Angels Without Wings and support of one of the monuments in honor of Reckless. She also hosts two Facebook pages for Reckless: Sgt Reckless and the Official Sgt Reckless Fan Club group.
Janet Barrett’s website is found at theycalledherreckless.com, and you can email her using About_Reckless @ comcast.net
Tom Clavin’s website is found at tomclavin.com, and you can send him an email at beachreading @ gmail.com
Sources for this episode
Books:

Barrett, J. (2013). They Called Her Reckless — A True Story of War, Love And One Extraordinary Horse. Tall Cedar Books, Chester, CT.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Clavin, T. (2015). Reckless: The Racehorse Who Became a Marine Corps Hero. Penguin, New York, NY.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Geer, A. (1955). Reckless, Pride of the Marines. E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., N.Y.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com, as well as a free pdf download from archive.com

Hutton, R. (2014) Sgt. Reckless: America’s War Horse. Regnery Publishing, Washington, D.C.
Available from amazon.com to read in print or Kindle format, or as an audiobook in Audible format

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Walt, L. (1953). Korean War Project Record: USMC-2249 CD: 22 (United States Marine Corps Unit Name: 1st Marine Division Records Group: RG 127) United States Marine Corps History Division, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland. Retrieved through Korean War Project (Hal Barker, Ed.) Dallas, TX on 17 November 2016
http://www.koreanwar.org

General link to the Marine Corps command diaries:
(n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from
http://koreanwar.org/html/usmc_korean_war_records.html

More specifically, Reckless is mentioned in the Command Diaries of March 1953:
Barker, H. (n.d.). Command Diaries March 1953. Retrieved December 29, 2016, from
http://www.koreanwar2.org/kwp2/usmc/081/m081_cd22_1953_03_2249.pdf


Pride of the Marines



We continue the story of Reckless, a native Korean mare who became a United States Marine. This episode goes to the core of this extraordinary mare’s life with her “herd” of Marines. The first part of the story is told in Episode 2, Flame of the Morning.

How is it possible that a horse would so selflessly sacrifice her own safety and comfort, often working alone (and astoundingly hard) under enemy fire and out of sheer bondedness with her fellow Marines? Unlike them, she couldn’t grasp the ideology of anti-communism, the belief in American freedom, or the struggle for territorial control, and yet you have to wonder if it isn’t the same bond that fuels bravery and heroism among humans in battle as well.

It is a horse’s nature to act to save the herd, because there is safety in numbers. Like the men, she knew she was part of a team, and she did what she could to save her buddies’ skin.

Follow our story about this little red mare, the size of a pony, with a heart as deep as the ones of national legends like Man o’ War or Secretariat. Like them, she gave it her all.

Listen as Abby tells the story of how this young horse became a centerpiece of the Marines’ efforts to prevail in the midst of a brutal war.

Sources for this episode

Books:

Barrett, J. (2013). They Called Her Reckless — A True Story of War, Love And One Extraordinary Horse. Tall Cedar Books, Chester, CT.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Clavin, T. (2015). Reckless: The Racehorse Who Became a Marine Corps Hero. Penguin, New York, NY.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Geer, A. (1955). Reckless, Pride of the Marines. E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., N.Y.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com, as well as a free pdf download from archive.com

Hutton, R. (2014) Sgt. Reckless: America’s War Horse. Regnery Publishing, Washington, D.C.
Available from amazon.com to read in print or Kindle format, or as an audiobook in Audible format

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Walt, L. (1953). Korean War Project Record: USMC-2249 CD: 22 (United States Marine Corps Unit Name: 1st Marine Division Records Group: RG 127) United States Marine Corps History Division, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland. Retrieved through Korean War Project (Hal Barker, Ed.) Dallas, TX on 17 November 2016
http://www.koreanwar.org

General link to the Marine Corps command diaries:
(n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from
http://koreanwar.org/html/usmc_korean_war_records.html

More specifically, Reckless is mentioned in the Command Diaries of March 1953:
Barker, H. (n.d.). Command Diaries March 1953. Retrieved December 29, 2016, from
http://www.koreanwar2.org/kwp2/usmc/081/m081_cd22_1953_03_2249.pdf

On the effect of weight carrying in riding horses:
Powell, D.M., et al (2008). Evaluation of indicators of weight carrying ability of light riding horses. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. 28(1): 28-33 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2007.11.008

Contributors:

Ricky Bloxsom, Visual Design and Website Development
Lanin’s Southern Serenaders, “Shake It and Break It”, Antique Phonograph Recording
Christian Gundermann, Show Notes
Beth Linnetz, Quality Review
Janet Barrett, Historical Details
Content Critique Team:
Ali Bloxsom
Anna Bloxsom
Amanda Winer


Flame of the Morning



This episode explores the bond between humans and horses through an unusual story from the middle of the twentieth century. In this first episode of a three-part story, we introduce you to a little horse whom the U.S. Marines acquired, named, trained, employed, and lived with, during the last months of the Korean War.

We trace the last wave of global decolonization; the effort of the United States to step into the void left by the collapsing colonial powers and assert global dominance; and millennia of human cohabitation with equines: breeding, selection, training, and the rise of human civilizations based on what their horses enabled them to do.

In this story, we also get a sense of how much has changed in U.S. culture over the last 60 years since the Marines chose this horse as their comrade-in-arms. In the 1950s, it was still common to find experienced horsemen in the U.S. military, and they played an important role in the events as they happened.

We can speculate about the horse’s genetics and breeding, which by themselves draw a map of world history. This little red native Korean mare, the size of a pony, had a heart as big as the one of national legends like Man o’ War or Secretariat. Listen as Abby tells the story of how this young horse met some young Marines, and formed a bond that would not be broken.

Sources for this episode

Books:

Barrett, J. (2013). They Called Her Reckless — A True Story of War, Love And One Extraordinary Horse. Tall Cedar Books, Chester, CT.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Clavin, T. (2015). Reckless: The Racehorse Who Became a Marine Corps Hero. Penguin, New York, NY.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com

Geer, A. (1955). Reckless, Pride of the Marines. E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc., N.Y.
Available in print and Kindle versions from amazon.com, as well as a free pdf download from archive.com

Hutton, R. (2014) Sgt. Reckless: America’s War Horse. Regnery Publishing, Washington, D.C.
Available from amazon.com to read in print or Kindle format, or as an audiobook in Audible format

Documents retrieved from the Internet:

Walt, L. (1953). Korean War Project Record: USMC-2249 CD: 22 (United States Marine Corps Unit Name: 1st Marine Division Records Group: RG 127) United States Marine Corps History Division, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland. Retrieved through Korean War Project (Hal Barker, Ed.) Dallas, TX on 17 November 2016
http://www.koreanwar.org

General link to the Marine Corps command diaries:
(n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from
http://koreanwar.org/html/usmc_korean_war_records.html

More specifically, Reckless is mentioned in the Command Diaries of March 1953:
Barker, H. (n.d.). Command Diaries March 1953. Retrieved December 29, 2016, from
http://www.koreanwar2.org/kwp2/usmc/081/m081_cd22_1953_03_2249.pdf

On horse racing in Korea:
(n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from
As the Invasion began, Racegoers kept on Punting

On the history of the Ferghana horse in East Asia:
(n.d.). Retrieved November 29, 2016, from
http://www.ollisandoostermeijer.com/publications/the_importance_of_the_horse.html

On the genetic evidence of the Ferghana importation from Mongolia:
Kim, K.-1I., Yang, Y.-H., Lee, S.-S., Park, C., Ma, R., Bouzat, J. L. and Lewin, H. A. (1999), Phylogenetic relationships of Cheju horses to other horse breeds as determined by mtDNA D-loop sequence polymorphism. Animal Genetics, 30: 102–108. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2052.1999.00419.x

Contributors:

Ricky Bloxsom, Visual Design and Website Development


Watermark



This is a podcast about people and horses. Each episode, we tell a true story that connects to horses, horse people, or the horse business.

When you put people and horses in the same place, there are always going to be great stories to be told. There are backstories that tell how things happened, stories from the past that help us to understand the present, and of course stories that will make you laugh, or cry, or just say wow.

Landscapes, material traces, history beneath my feet, horses and humans living and working together: When I look at these things now, I also see them in the past. They layer, mingle, and blend together.

Personally, I like stories that are somehow new to me. Either I’ve never heard them before, or maybe never heard them like this before. I even like scary stories sometimes, simply because they challenge me to be brave. Put simply, I love a rippin’ yarn, and if you do too I hope you’ll enjoy what we put together for you here.

Each episode, we are going to share a story with you that starts as far back as it needs to, and goes on however long it needs to go on, including all of the details, the explanations, the side stories, and the extra context. Some of these will be fairly short, between forty minutes and an hour per episode, but if the story turns out to be longer we won’t cut it short to fit the format. We’re going to tell the Whole Story.

We hope to get you at least one episode a month, for now. If you don’t want to miss any of our great stories, be sure to subscribe to the podcast through your favorite podcatcher, or ask to be added to our email list and we will let you know each time we put out a new episode.

In any case, if you want to have a sense of what these stories are going to be like, listen to our first episode and have a little wander around inside my mind.

The support of many people was needed to make this happen:
Ricky Bloxsom, Visual Design and Website Development
Brian Hotaling, Episode Development, Voice
Lanin’s Southern Serenaders, “Shake It and Break It”, Antique Phonograph Recording
Beth Linnetz, Quality Review
Christian Gundermann, Show Notes
Mary Falardeau, a Key Contribution Early On
Chris Heinen, a Key Contribution in the Middle There
Dave Jackson, a Key Contribution at the Eleventh Hour
The Best Content Critique Team and Cheering Squad Ever:
Ali Bloxsom
Anna Bloxsom
Ralph Elwell
McDonald
Poosie Nemec
Karen Sebach
Amanda Winer
Julia Zetye
Ray Zetye